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Negley Son Spicy Honey

Set your beloved Sriracha aside, and prepare to hit your mouth with some bold, spicy sweetness from Negley & Son. The company offers three distinct flavors, all three of which aim to give your food a perfect kick. You have Classic Spicy, which is made from a secret blend of seven different peppers. Then you have the Smokey Chipotle, which adds smoke-dried jalapenos into the mix. Then, Ghost Pepper--flavored with one of the hottest peppers cultivated on the planet, the Bhut Jolokia. Yep, they've got our attention, too. We'll be looking to check it out soon, and will report back with our thoughts.

Read More | Negley Honey

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Linked bagel halves

Here’s a cool food hack that we just came across and had to share. Did you know that you can technically slice a bagel in such a way that the two halves are linked? Even better, when cut this way you get a little more surface area than the old school slice, which means that you can technically fit a bit more spread and goodness on it as well. Don’t believe me? Hit the link below for the full details, with diagrams on showing exactly where to cut the bagel and everything.

Read More | Mobius Sliced Linked Bagel

MesclunMany of the greens found in the wild have become legitimized by the popularity of mesclun mixes and intentionally cultivated. Mesclun, comes from a French word meaning “mixture.”  Originating in Provence, France, mesclun traditionally was a blend of chervil, arugula, lettuce, and endive. These were usually grown together and harvested when only a few inches high.

Mesclun in America is much more varied. Not only are the blends packed with eight to sixteen different kinds of greens, but they are also geared for different tastes.  Some are quite mild and contain much more lettuce. Peppery mescluns can have cresses, chicory, arugula, and mustards mixed with regular leaf lettuce. Many of the greens in these salad blends are: lettuces, endives, mustards, purslane, cresses, escarole, arugula, chard, and spinach. Exotic greens like mizuna from Japan or tat-soi from China are popular, too. Some mescluns even have herbs, like parsleys and fennels, and edible flowers.


French PurslaneMost wild salad greens are just pesky weeds to most people. Yet, many upscale supermarkets carry wild greens, and fine dining establishments use dandelion greens, a variety of watercresses, lambs quarters, and even French purslane in their creations. These weeds are really nutritious and very tasty. Wash them well, and chop or tear them into very small pieces to distribute their unique flavors. Use singly in a salad or mix them with other wild greens and domestic lettuces. Dress lightly so you don’t mask their flavors.  Besides eating them raw, these greens can be wilted or steamed and served with a vinaigrette dressing or a splash of balsamic vinegar.

Click to continue reading Wild Salad Greens Found in Your Supermarket


NasturtiumsIt has been long known that chefs use nasturtiums as garnishes and as ingredients in salads.  One of the first to peep out of the ground and burst into bloom are spring violets. These orchid-like flowers add color to spring salads, are used for garnishes for tea sandwiches and desserts, and can even be candied for wedding cake decorations.  Johnny-jumpups and pansies can also be candied for decorations.  Other flowers that can be a great addition to salads are calendula (tangy, peppery taste), anise hyssop (anise flavor), dianthus (pinks taste like cloves), lavender, lovage (celery flavor), and roses. Depending on the variety, marigolds can have a peppery taste or a citrus zing.  Squash blossoms have been used in salads, but are also stuffed, sauteed, or breaded and deep fried whole.


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