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3 steps to easily remove pomegranate seeds

Posted by Andru Edwards Categories: Features, How To, Fruit

Remove pomegranate seeds

If you've ever eaten a pomegranate, you've likely encountered the frustrating task of removing the seeds--but there's a better way. Rather than fighting a spoon (or your fingers) through the various nooks and crannies, splattering yourself with pomegranate juice stains in the process, try this much easier, faster approach to deseed a pomegranate:

  1. Cut off the ends of the pomegranate, creating two flat surfaces on the ends.
  2. Cut the pomegranate in half, and twist each half a bit to loosen the delicious seeds that are held within
  3. Grab something sturdy like a wooden spoon, and hit the flat part of the pomegranate half that you created in the first step. The seeds should easily fall out, so make sure you have a bowl or container underneath the pomegranate that you're hitting
  4. Enjoy!

Give it a try, and let us know how it works out for you in the comments! If you want more a more detailed tutorial full of pictures, head on over to Instructables.

Read More | Instructables

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Recipe: Diced Rainbow Fruit & Veggie Salad

Salad

My husband Andru has come to the realization that a lot of the food we eat on a daily basis contains a lot of sodium. Not because I have chosen to dash everything we consume with a bit of salt here and there, but because some foods come into our home with so much added salt through processing. He was fuming about how he had chosen to purchase some soup simply because the label said “Organic” because in our mind set “organic” is supposed to mean good for you, but that is not necessarily true so he went off in a tirade after reading the label and seeing that in a one cup serving of this “good” soup there was 980 mg. of sodium, 41% of the sodium we need for the day in one cup of delicious death. He was very concerned that this percentage was in relation to an adult’s body mass, not a 3 year-olds tiny frame. How much sodium can a toddler take before a salt-induced coma? Anyway, to alleviate his worries, he is on a mission to eat more foods that are “living”, meaning less meat and processed foods and more fruits and vegetables.

In order to support his new found revelation, I decided one night to come up with a raw fruit and vegetable salad that is delicious despite not being smothered in dressing—and I aptly named it Rainbow Fruit & Veggie salad because after all was said and done, I threw in so many different colors of fruits and veggies, it became a taste sensation for the eyes. I was very tempted to add a touch of sugar to the natural dressing mixed in, but then thought, well that defeats the whole purpose, so instead added some strawberries for that touch of sweetness. Voila…a new recipe was born, and Andru loved it and the kids seemed to like it also, thank you strawberries. It is a great side dish and the recipe can be varied in so many ways, I added raw zucchini when I made it a second time and it was a hit at our Fellowship meal after church. I hope it pleases your taste buds also!

Click to continue reading Recipe: Diced Rainbow Fruit & Veggie Salad


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